The most beautiful castle in Europe Mont st Michel

 
 

11 Comments

  1. Sam says:

    This is not a castle this is a monastery, please do not make this mistake again, as it shows great ignorance as they are two completely different things.

    • Josh says:

      For more people, the word “castle” refers more to the type of structure than who lives in it. If a king & queen lived in a trailer home, nobody would call it a castle. This building, however, is a castle, even if it’s full of monks.

  2. Nils says:

    Well Sam… I think with opulence like that depicted anyone can be forgiven for calling this a castle.

  3. BB says:

    Because nothing says I love you God better than a big massive outrageous fortified monastery. And if this isn’t a castle, it’s a fortress. Look at those fortification towers!

  4. FiFa says:

    The fortification towers are used to keep the God and Devil inside.

  5. Chris says:

    I’ve been there oddly enough on behalf of the US Navy port call! Great snails for dinner!

  6. Yan says:

    The construction started at beginning of the 8th century, finished end of the 10th century. It’s, like every middle age cities, a fortified city, with a fortress where the noble in charge of the city lived, a church and a monastery … right now there are still 36 people living there and 4 monks in the monastery. The Hall of the nobles and the hall of the knights are the two biggest rooms of the fortress.

  7. Rich says:

    The first time I ever heard of Mont St. Michel was when playing the game Onimusha 3, which takes you through the sewers of Paris, to Notre Dame, and finally to the streets of this beautiful place. For a computer game, it really opened my eyes to France’s architectural history.

  8. Frankie says:

    Sam you are a douche! the structure is a castle moron.

  9. Geo says:

    …but above all, this is also a house. XD Beautiful picture of this castle, that is also a monastery, but is also some people’s house.

  10. Lee says:

    It’s fortified because it lies so close to Britain, which was often at war with France. It is a monastery, not a castle, but that doesn’t make it any less stunning from afar. It’s actually extremely plain as you would expect a monastery to be inside (and jammed to the gills with tourists and tourism shops, which kind of wrecks the spiritual/historical feel).

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